Category Archives: Black Death

Spring Reading

spring1
It has been a busy spring. I haven’t had a chance to blog as much as I would have liked to, but I have done quite a bit of reading. Some of my reading has been on the complex world of the first plague pandemic. To say that it was transformative would be an understatement.  One of the social questions for the first plague pandemic is how does plague and other natural disasters effect a population that is the midst of conversion?  When the Black Death came it encountered a fully Christian and Muslim world, but not so during the first pandemic. Most of Europe was not yet Christian in 541. There were some Jews, Christians of several varieties, Roman pagans, Germanic pagans, Celtic pagans, Zoroastrians, North African and Middle Eastern pagans, etc. Yet at the end of the pandemic period, Islam is born (and fast growing) and Christianity is dominant in Europe (and united by Rome). The plague began in a polytheistic world and ended in a monotheistic one. What role did the plague play, if any? Yet to be determined. This really isn’t a peripheral issue. Every writer of the first pandemic was involved in this transformation (winners and losers) in some way and it effected how they wrote about the plague and other calamities. So I have a lot of reading to do; below is a start and a few other things that caught my attention.

Books:

Marilyn Dunn. (2010) The Christianization of the Anglo-Saxons, c. 497- c.700: Discourses of Life, Death and Afterlife.

Marilyn Dunn (2013) Belief and Religion in Barbarian Europe, c. 350-700. Bloomsbury.

Peter Brown (2015) The Ransom of the Soul: Afterlife and Wealth in Early Christianity. Harvard University Press.

Peter Heather (2013) The Restoration of Rome: Barbarian Popes and Imperial Pretenders. Oxford University Press.

Articles:

Balbir Singh and Cyrus Saneshvar (2013) Human Infections and Detection of Plasmodium knowlesi. Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 26 (2): 165-184.

Runfola, J. K., House, J., Miller, L., Coltron, L., Hite, D., Hawley, A., et al. (2015). Outbreak of Human Pneumonic Plague with Dog-to-Human and Possible Human-to-Human Transmission — Colorado, June–July 2014. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 64(16), 429–434.

Smith-Guzmán, N. E. (2015). Cribra orbitalia in the ancient Nile Valley and its connection to malaria. International Journal of Paleopathology, 10, 1–12. doi:10.1016/j.ijpp.2015.03.001

Benovitz, N. (2014). The Justinianic plague: evidence from the dated Greek epitaphs of Byzantine Palestine and Arabia. Journal of Roman Archaeology. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70323-2)

Bernard Bachrach, (2007) Plague, Population, and Economy in Merovingian Gaul. Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association. 3: 29-57.

Sarris, P. (2002). The Justinianic plague: origins and effects. Continuity and Change, 17(02), 169–182. doi:10.1017/S0268416002004137

Newfield, T. P. (2015). Human–Bovine Plagues in the Early Middle Ages. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 46(1), 1–38. doi:10.1179/146141010X12640787648612

Inskip, S. A., Taylor, G. M., Zakrzewski, S. R., Mays, S. A., Pike, A. W. G., Llewellyn, G., et al. (2015). Osteological, Biomolecular and Geochemical Examination of an Early Anglo-Saxon Case of Lepromatous Leprosy. PLoS ONE, 10(5), e0124282. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124282.s001

Shanks, G. D., & White, N. J. (2013). The activation of vivax malaria hypnozoites by infectious diseases. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 13(10), 900–906. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70095-1

Dick, H. C., Pringle, J. K., Sloane, B., Carver, J., Haffenden, A., Stephen Porter, H. A., et al. (2015). Detection and characterisation of Black Death burials by multi-proxy geophysical methods. Journal of Archaeological Science, 1–50. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2015.04.010

Lowell, J. L., Antolin, M. F., Andersen, G. L., Hu, P., Stokowski, R. P., & Gage, K. L. (2015). Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Reveal Spatial Diversity Among Clones of Yersinia pestis During Plague Outbreaks in Colorado and the Western United States. Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.), 15(5), 291–302. doi:10.1089/vbz.2014.1714

Neil, B. (2013). The Papacy in the Age of Gregory the Great. A Companion to Gregory the Great, 3–28.

Brogiolo, G. P. (2015). Flooding in Northern Italy during the Early Middle Ages: resilience and adaption. Post-Classical Archaeologies, 5, 47–68.

Kostick, C., & Ludlow, F. (2015). The dating of volcanic events and their impact upon European society, 400-800 CE. Post-Classical Archaeologies.  5, 7–30.

Riehm, J. M., Projahn, M., Vogler, A. J., Rajerison, M., Andersen, G., Hall, C. M., et al. (2015). Diverse Genotypes of Yersinia pestis Caused Plague in Madagascar in 2007. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 9(6), e0003844. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003844.s002

Makundi, R. H., Massawe, A. W., Borremans, B., Laudisoit, A., & Katakweba, A. (2015). We are connected: flea–host association networks in the plague outbreak focus in the Rift Valley, northern Tanzania. Wildlife Research, 42(2), 196. doi:10.1071/WR14254

Contours of the Black Death Cemetery at Charterhouse Square, London

Excavations for the Crossrail Extension project discovered the second major Black Death cemetery in London in 2013. This week the first peer-reviewed publication of findings from the site appeared (in press).  As a rescue excavation in the midst of a construction project, the site had to be quickly surveyed for the extent of the cemetery and this is what is contained in this publication.

This site is part of 13 acres leased by Sir Walter de Mauny from St Bartholomew’s Priory for an emergency cemetery for plague victims in 1349 AD.  The site has been used for a variety of purposes over the centuries and currently is a four acre green space called Charterhouse square. The site is graphically displayed below with the locations of later structures.

Crossrails site, London
Crossrails site in Charterhouse Square, London (Dick et al., 2015)

The initial discovery came in a shaft just to the southwest of the Charterhouse Square. There they found three layers of graves with a total of 25 bodies lacking signs of trauma and with pottery shards from 1270-1350 AD. Subsequent radiocarbon dating and aDNA analysis confirmed that they were victims of the Black Death.

The surveys conducted over just two days were able to outline the broad contours of features at the site. These included a 15th century building, a priory kitchen, a probable World War II submerged emergency water tank, and a possible ditch and bank along the cemetery that is mentioned in descriptions. They believe that a disturbed area in the southwest corner represents about 200 individual graves, although only excavation can confirm these graves. They concluded that their ability to detect medieval objects in such an intensely used urban area suggests these methods are a good option for similar future situations.

The scans also revealed some surprises. There are not as many graves as descriptions suggest should have been there, though bodies may be more dense that suggested by the scans. They also did not find any large pits of  stacked bodies. This indicates that even during the height of the Black Death, many people were still buried in individual graves. Graves were found in three phases with layers of clay-rich earth in between perhaps in an attempt to seal the graves. These scans should allow them to target future excavations to areas with a high probability of dense graves.

Reference:

Dick, H. C., Pringle, J. K., Sloane, B., Carver, J., Haffenden, A., Stephen Porter, H. A., et al. (2015). Detection and characterisation of Black Death burials by multi-proxy geophysical methods. Journal of Archaeological Science, 1–50. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2015.04.010 [In press, accepted manuscript]

Expanding the Historical Plague Paradigm

When the first complete genomic sequence of Yersinia pestis was published on October 4, 2001 the world was naturally focused elsewhere, on anthrax bioterrorism — the Amerithrax incident was then in its second week– and the September 11 attacks were just over three weeks old. As the world redeveloped bioterrorism assessments and plans, plague was placed on lists along with anthrax, smallpox and yes, ebola as agents of national security concern and response.  Although plague produced more annual cases than most agents on the category A bioterrorism list, it was placed on the list primarily based on its historical reputation and past attempts to weaponize it (also based on its reputation). Yet, in 2001 there was a fierce debate ranging among historians and others on whether Yersinia pestis was the agent of the Black Death at all.

It would take another ten years before genomics would revolutionize our understanding of the historical plague. On October 12, 2011 the first draft sequence of an ancient plague genome was published. Finally, adding to the detection of Yersinia pestis DNA tests previously done on remains, the draft sequence isolated from the East Smithfield Black Death cemetery in London solidified consensus that Yersinia pestis is the agent of the Black Death pandemic.  Meanwhile, the phylogenetic tree of Yersinia pestis had been constructed based on the genetic sequence of isolates from all over the globe. Ancient and modern Yersinia pestis genomes were opening a new window into the history of the species.

As fundamental as genomic analysis is to the new understanding of historical plague, it is a skeleton of data that is open to many different historical interpretations. Science can’t adequately explain the historic plague epidemics alone; it takes historical context. In the inaugural double issue of The Medieval Globe,  Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death (open access) begins this process. The eleven articles in this issue take the genetic identification of Yersinia pestis  as the agent of the Black Death as foundational and integrate modern biological and epidemiological information into a new global Old World assessment of the history of the Black Death and subsequent epidemics. Each of these articles lays the groundwork for future interdisciplinary work between historians, anthropologists, biologists, epidemiologists and others.

In my own contribution to this issue, “The Black Death and the Future of the Plague” I discuss why plague is still important in the modern world and for our future. Plague has played an integral role in the development of the re-emerging infectious diseases paradigm and is an agent of biosecurity concern. I review the current state of plague around the world, what we have learned about plague epidemiology and transmission, and how it can be applied to historic epidemics. I also make my case for why the study of the entire history of plague is uniquely important and why the sciences and humanities must move forward together.  I hope we can engage in a discussion on these issues here in the comments section, on twitter or by email.

My own interest and awareness of the issues surrounding the study of the plague was transformed when I had the great fortune to be invited by Monica Green to participate in a session at the American Historical Association annual meeting in New Orleans, January 2013. The group of plague scholars gathered there has largely remained in contact and expanded our network into an informal working group that has enriched all of our scholarship.  No one can become fully conversant with all of the disciplines involved in the study of even one epidemic, much less the entire history of the plague.  Working in disciplinary seclusion will not produce a satisfying paradigm or widespread consensus. It takes work, patience and some tolerance of how other disciplines work, but I have found it to always be worth it. I hope you will agree.

Some references for the milestones mentioned:

Parkhill, J., Wren, B. W., Thomson, N. R., Titball, R. W., Holden, M. T., Prentice, M. B., et al. (2001). Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. Nature, 413(6855), 523–527. doi:10.1038/35097083

Morelli, G., Song, Y., Mazzoni, C. J., Eppinger, M., Roumagnac, P., Wagner, D. M., et al. (2010). Yersinia pestis genome sequencing identifies patterns of global phylogenetic diversity. Nature Genetics, 1–20. doi:10.1038/ng.705

Little, L. K. (2011). Plague Historians in Lab Coats. Past & Present, 213(1), 267–290. doi:10.1093/pastj/gtr014

Bos, K. I., Schuenemann, V. J., Golding, G. B., Burbano, H. A., Waglechner, N., Coombes, B. K., et al. (2011). A draft genome of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death. Nature, 1–5. doi:10.1038/nature10549

Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death. Edited by Monica Green. The Medieval Globe, 1 (1), 2014.