Private SNAFU learns about Malaria

Malaria was a major risk for American troops during World War II. The US Army enlisted the help of Theodor Geisil, Dr Seuss, to produce educational booklets and pamphlets (discussed here). They also turned to moving pictures to educate the troops. ¬†Private Snafu was featured in a catalog of 26 SNAFU training films based on... Continue Reading →

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Plasmodium knowlesi: A New Ancient Malaria Parasite

There are over a hundred different species of the malaria-causing¬†Plasmodium parasites in reptiles, birds and mammals. Being so widespread among terrestrial vertebrates, zoonotic transfer of Plasmodium has come at humans from multiple different sources. Plasmodium knowlesi had been known for some time as a parasite of long-tailed macaques but was not considered a significant human... Continue Reading →

The Super-spreading Landscape of Urban Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever is one of the most concerning emerging infectious diseases of the early 21st century. The virus has been spreading with its ever-expanding host, the mosquito Aedes aegypti.¬† For the last several years there have been naturally acquired cases of dengue fever in the United States and Europe, that are not connected to travel.... Continue Reading →

Mapping Malaria in Anglo-Saxon England

England once looked very different. Much of southern Britain was marshland for most of the island's occupied history. These bogs, fens, and marshes ensured that areas of virtual wilderness persisted from before Roman Britain through the Norman period and beyond. Despite the difficulties of using fenlands, these areas were not only occupied throughout the Anglo-Saxon... Continue Reading →

Malaria Near the Arctic Circle

When I think of Finland, malaria just doesn't normally come to mind. Although northern climes often have swarms of mosquitoes, its hard to imagine mosquito-borne infections gaining much traction in the short summer season. Yet defying imagination, malaria has thrived in northern Finland, Sweden and Russia near the arctic circle in the past. In the... Continue Reading →

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