CFP: Contagions sessions at the International Congress for Medieval Studies 2018

by Michelle Ziegler Contagions: The Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies has been given the opportunity of organizing three sessions at next year's International Congress for Medieval Studies. This is the equivalent of a full day at the congress. The Congress will be held from May 10 to May 13, 2018, at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo... Continue Reading →

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Summer reading

  The summer is officially over this week so its time for my quarterly reading update. I read a more eclectic mix of topics this summer than usual. These are just those that really stood out as being useful for my purposes. I hope you find something of interest! Books Gregory Aldrete. Floods of the... Continue Reading →

Ebola’s Chain of Infection

A chain of infection is a method for organizing the basic information needed to respond to an epidemic.  I've gathered the best information I've been able to find. As the current epidemic is analyzed, there is no doubt some of the recommendations and basic knowledge will change. The Ebola Virus (EBOV) The Ebola virus is... Continue Reading →

General Principles of Zoonotic Landscape Epidemiology

Zoonoses, pathogens with animal reservoirs, exist as part of a complex system of interactions between animal reservoirs, vectors, ecological factors and human interaction. Landscape epidemiology has existed as a field of study since Russian epidemiologist E.N. Pavlovsky coined the term and laid the groundwork in the 1960s. Landscape epidemiology is in essence the study of... Continue Reading →

Trench Fever: An Ancient Zoonosis

Trench fever is an ancient disease with a surprisingly short history. Named after its discovery in the trenches of World War I, its case history is only about a century old. Yet, the louse transmitted Bartonella quintana that causes trench fever has been found in human remains as old as 4000 years and is one... Continue Reading →

The Landscape of Super-Spreading

Super-spreading individuals and disease hot spots have been known for over a century, but rarely have they been considered together. Sara Paull and colleagues [1] have pulled together all of the recent work the ecology of disease hot spots and transmission heterogeneity (super spreading) to explore the continuum between individual transmission heterogeneity and the landscape... Continue Reading →

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