Retrospective Diagnosis in the 21st Century

The way we make and think about retrospective diagnosis is changing. Over the last decade, laboratory results have become the preferred (maybe even mandatory) method of making a retrospective diagnosis [1]. To extrapolate a few positive laboratory results to cover an entire epidemic, it must correlate with reported signs and symptoms and ideally epidemiology. There... Continue Reading →

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The Dancing Plague of 1518

John Waller. The Dancing Plague: The Strange, True Story of an Extraordinary Illness. Sourcebooks, 2009 (paperback). Previously published as A Time to Dance, A Time to Die: The Extraordinary Story of the Dancing Plague of 1518 (Icon books, hardback, 2008). Topic: Dancing Mania, choreomania Time and Place: Strasbourg, Holy Roman Empire, 1518 Audience: General Discussion:... Continue Reading →

Contagions Round-up 17: Historic Medicine and Populations

This time I'm going to concentrate on historically important infectious diseases, and historic medicine and populations. So here is what the blogosphere has to offer from the last couple weeks. Michael Walsh of Infection Landscapes discusses two historically important infections: Salmonellosis and Typhoid fever. Small Things Considered gives their views on the discovery of Yersinia... Continue Reading →

CFP: Health and Healing in Early Medieval Medicine

Call for Papers to 47th International Congress of Medieval Studies May 10-13, 2012 Western Michigan University at Kalamazoo Health and Healing in Early Medieval Medicine: Influences, Theory and Practices This interdisciplinary session will explore all aspects of the health and healing in Europe and the Mediterranean world from approximately 400 to 1100 AD. We are... Continue Reading →

Research plans and this blog

I suppose I need structure, even for my little independent projects. I don't know what will become of these projects or how long they will last, but this will explain some of what you will see on this blog over the next couple years. Projects: Bioarchaeology of the Plague: I've been looking for a term... Continue Reading →

Medica Sessions at Kalamazoo

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages teamed up with AVISTA: The Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science and Art to offer four sessions at the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, Michigan. The four sessions are organized around the theme "The Sacred... Continue Reading →

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