Category Archives: blogging

Looking back on the autumn

fall-2016

This fall was quite the chaotic jumble — not all bad. One project successfully completed. A door closed but I think another better one may be opening. Somehow in the midst of all this I managed to do a little reading, so here is what that stood out for the fall (and early winter).

My publications

Ziegler, M. (2016) Landscapes of DiseaseLandscapes, 17.2. 99-107. An introduction to the concept of ‘landscapes of disease’ and the articles in the issue. (Open access)

Ziegler, M. (2016) Malarial Landscapes in Late Antique Rome and the Tiber Valley  Landscapes, 17.2: 139-155.

Books

  • Yong, Ed. (2016) I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life. Ecco.  microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)
  • Holland, John. (2014) Complexity: A Short Introduction. OUP microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)
  • Bronton, Jerry (2004) The Renaissance: A Short Introduction. OUP. microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)
  • Tim Clarkson (2016) Scotland’s Merlin: A Medieval Legend and It’s Dark Age Origins. John Donald/Birlinn.      microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)
  • Hamerow, Helena. (2012) Rural Settlements and Society in Anglo-Saxon England. OUP. microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)microscope23 (1)

Articles

  • Arnold, E. F. (2017). Rivers of Risk and Redemption in Gregory of Tours’ Writings. Speculum, 92(1), 117–143. http://doi.org/10.1086/689460
  • Arnold, E. F. (2014). Fluid Identities: Poetry and the Navigation of Mixed Ethnicities in Late Antique Gaul. Ecozon@, 1–19.
  • Bahl, J., Pham, T. T., Hill, N. J., Hussein, I. T. M., Ma, E. J., Easterday, B. C., et al. (2016). Ecosystem Interactions Underlie the Spread of Avian Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential. PLoS Pathogens, 12(5), e1005620–20. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005620
  • Carmichael, A. G., & Silverstein, A. M. (1987). Smallpox in Europe before the seventeenth century: virulent killer or benign disease? Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 42(2), 147–168.

  • Duggan, A. T., Perdomo, M. F., Piombino-Mascali, D., Marciniak, S., Poinar, D., Emery, M. V., et al. (2016). 17th Century Variola Virus Reveals the Recent History of Smallpox. Current Biology, 1–7. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.061
  • Fauci, A. S., & Morens, D. M. (2016). Zika virus in the Americas—yet another arbovirus threat. New England Journal of Medicine, 374(7), 601–604.

  • Jones, L. (2016). The Diseased Landscape: Medieval and Early Modern Plaguescapes. Landscapes, 17(2), 108–123. http://doi.org/10.1080/14662035.2016.1251102
  • Marciniak, S., Prowse, T. L., Herring, D. A., Klunk, J., Kuch, M., Duggan, A. T., et al. (2016). Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 1st–2nd century CE southern Italy. Current Biology, 26(23), R1220–R1222. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.016
  • Slavin, P. (2016). Epizootic Landscapes: Sheep Scab and Regional Environment in England in 1279–1280. Landscapes, 17(2), 156–170. http://doi.org/10.1080/14662035.2016.1251040
  • Valtuena, A. A., Mittnik, A., Massy, K., Allmae, R., Daubaras, M., Jankauskas, R., et al. (2016). The Stone Age Plague: 1000 years of Persistence in Eurasia. BioRxiv Preprint, 28. http://doi.org/10.1101/094243
  • Walsh, M. G., Amstislavski, P., Greene, A., & Haseeb, M. A. (2016). The Landscape Epidemiology of Seasonal Clustering of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) in Domestic Poultry in Africa, Europe and Asia. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 1–14. http://doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12537
  • Whittemore, K., Tate, A., Illescas, A., & Saffa, A. (2017). Zika Virus Knowledge among Pregnant Women Who Were in Areas with Active Transmission. Emerging Infectious …. http://doi.org/10.3201/eid2106.150270

  • Yue, R. P. H., Lee, H. F., & Wu, C. Y. H. (2016). Navigable rivers facilitated the spread and recurrence of plague in pre-industrial Europe. Scientific Reports, 1–8. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep34867

A Summer in review

 

summer-16

Its been a long and stressful summer. Projects are moving along and there should be more news to share on one of those projects in the next couple months. Other projects set in motion this summer may take a year or more to run their course. So the articles I’m sharing below are just some of my reading that stood out as being useful, along with my some relevant medieval history books.

My new publication! This is based on a presentation I have at Kalamazoo in 2011.

Ziegler, M. R. (2016). Plague in Bede’s Prose Life of Cuthbert. In The Sacred and the Secular in Medieval Healing (pp. 65–77). Routledge.

Books

Williamson, T. (2015). Environment, society and landscape in Early Medieval England. Boydell Press.

Hamerow, H. (2012). Rural Settlements and Society in Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford University Press. 

Curently reading: Tim Clarkson (2016) Scotland’s Merlin: A Medieval Legend and It’s Dark Age Origins. John Donald/Birlinn. (Not directly related to a project, but good, fun reading.)

Articles

Christodoulopoulos, G., Theodoropoulos, G., Kominakis, A., & Theis, J. H. (2006). Biological, seasonal and environmental factors associated with Pulex irritans infestation of dairy goats in Greece. Veterinary Parasitology, 137(1-2), 137–143. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2005.12.012

Feldman, M., Harbeck, M., Keller, M., Spyrou, M. A., Rott, A., Trautmann, B., et al. (2016). A high-coverage Yersinia pestis Genome from a 6th-century Justinianic Plague Victim. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 1–31.

Kenward, H. (1999). Insect remains as indicators of zonation of land use and activity in Roman Carlisle, England. Reports from the Environmental Archaeology Unit (Vol. 99, pp. 1–30).

Ferraguti, M., la Puente, J. M.-D., Roiz, D., Ruiz, S., Soriguer, R., & Figuerola, J. (2016). Effects of landscape anthropization on mosquito community composition and abundance. Scientific Reports, 6, 1–9. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep29002

Jones, L., & Nevell, R. (2016). Plagued by doubt and viral misinformation: the need for evidence-based use of historical disease images. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 1–6. http://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30119-0

Caron, A., Cappelle, J., Cumming, G. S., de Garine-Wichatitsky, M., & Gaidet, N. (2015). Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems. Veterinary Research, 46(1), 1–11. http://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-015-0217-9

Purcell, N. (1996). Rome and the management of water: environment, culture and power. In G. Shipley & J. B. Salmon (Eds.), Human Landscapes in Classical Antiquity (pp. 103–119). London: Routledge.

Christie, N. (1996). Barren fields? Landscapes and settlements in late Roman and post-Roman Italy. In G. Shipley & J. B. Salmon (Eds.), Human Landscapes in Classical Antiquity (pp. 144–160). London: Routledge.

Scheidel, W. 2015. Death and the City: Ancient Rome and Beyond. Available at SSRN 2609651. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2609651

O’Sullivan, A. (2008). Early medieval houses in Ireland: social identity and dwelling spaces. Peritia, 20, 225–256.

Bousema, T., Griffin, J. T., Sauerwein, R. W., Smith, D. L., Churcher, T. S., Takken, W., et al. (2012). Hitting Hotspots: Spatial Targeting of Malaria for Control and Elimination. PLoS Medicine, 9(1), e1001165–7. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001165

What’s in a name?

The post-Roman centuries in Europe have a bit of an identity crisis. If we defined the period from when the Western Emperor was abolished in 480 to the crowning of Charlemagne as Holy Roman Emperor on Christmas day 800 AD, what would you call it? At times I’ve used all of these names, and a good argument can be made for all of them. I’m curious what my readers prefer.