Category Archives: Malaria

Reading in August

august

Just a little update on my reading in August. I’ve been jumping around a bit reading on the history of malaria and wetlands.  Lots of interesting bits and pieces!

Books

  • John Aberth. An Environmental History of the Middle Ages: The Crucible of Nature, 2013.
  • Gregory of Tours (d. 594): Glory of the Confessors 
  • Gregory of Tours (d. 594): The Life of the Fathers
    • Looking at what diseases people are seeking cures for primarily at the shrines of the saints.
  • William McNeill, Plagues and Peoples. 1976.
    • I reread this book about every ten years, so I’m working my way through it over lunch at work at the present. Odd to reread a book I first read in the late 1980s as a student.  Its surprising how well it holds up, but it is now out of date in biology, history and anthropology. It really can’t be used to represent modern views on either infectious disease biology or history. We really need a new, updated edition!  Just to give a few examples, HIV hadn’t even been identified in 1976 (as McNeill mentions in the preface of the 1998 edition) and antibiotic resistance and ‘(re)emerging infectious diseases’ were not considered critical problems (although both had begun to appear).
  • Robert Sallares, Malaria and Rome: A History of Malaria in Ancient Italy. 2002 (in progress)
 Standout Papers – (more or less in order they were read)
  • Couser, J. (2010). The Changing Fortunes of Early Medieval Bavaria to 907 ad. History Compass, 8(4), 330–344. doi:10.1111/j.1478-0542.2009.00671.x
  • King, G., & Henderson, C. (2013). Living cheek by jowl: The pathoecology of medieval York. Quaternary International, xxx, 1–12. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2013.07.032
  • Förster, F., Großmann, R., Hinz, M., Iwe, K., Kinkel, H., Larsen, A., et al. (2013). Towards mutual understanding within interdisciplinary palaeoenvironmental research: An exemplary analysis of the term landscape. Quaternary International, 312(C), 4–11. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2013.07.045
  • Rippon, S. (2009). ‘Uncommonly rich and fertile’ or “not very salubrious?” The Perception and Value of Wetland Landscapes. Landscapes, 10(1), 39–60.
  • Bankoff, G. (2013). The“English Lowlands” and the North Sea Basin System: A History of Shared Risk. Environment and History, 19(1), 3–37.
  • Justin T. Noetzel. Monster, Demon, Warrior: St Guthlac and the Cultural Landscape of the Anglo-Saxon Fens. Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Volume 45, 2014, pp. 105-131.
  • O’Sullivan, L., Jardine, A., Cook, A., & Weinstein, P. (2008). Deforestation, mosquitoes, and ancient Rome: Lessons for today. BioScience, 58(8), 756–760.

Early use of the term ‘malaria’

Early use of the term ‘malaria’

I was reading Robert Sallares’ Malaria and Rome this evening and I noticed some information on the earliest use of the term ‘malaria’ that I thought would be worth sharing.

As we have all learned, malaria comes from the Italian mal’ aria, meaning ‘bad air’. A few other interesting facts:

  • Marco Cornaro’s books Scitture della laguna  published in Venice in 1440 is the earliest use of the term mal aere.
  • Horace Walpole was the first to introduce the word malaria to English literature in his Letters in 1740 : “There is a horrid thing called malaria, that comes to Rome every summer, and kills one” (p. 9).
  • Guido Baccelli’s La malaria di Roma, published in 1878, is the first application of the term specifically to the disease.

Does anyone know of earlier uses of the term?

Source: Robert Sallares, Malaria and Rome: A History of malaria in ancient Italy. Oxford University Press, 2002.

 

Reading in July

July 2014 reading 1

 

As I start working on my book project, I’m going to have less time to develop blog posts, so I thought I would share what I’m reading with you each month. This will also give me an incentive to keep blogging and reading! I’ll list the books I’ve read and the papers that I thought were particularly interesting.

Books

Papers

  • Squatriti, Paolo. “Offa’s Dyke Between Nature and Culture.” Environmental History, 2004, 37–56.
  • Squatriti, Paolo. “The Floods of 589 and Climate Change at the Beginning of the Middle Ages: an Italian Microhistory.” Speculum 85, no. 4 (November 18, 2010): 799–826. doi:10.1017/S0038713410002290.
  • Slavin, P. “Warfare and Ecological Destruction in Early Fourteenth-Century British Isles.” Environmental History 19, no. 3 (June 20, 2014): 528–50. doi:10.1093/envhis/emu033.